Improve Your Boiler’s Combustion Efficiency PDF Print E-mail
Written by USDOE Office of Industrial Technologies   
Tuesday, 08 June 2010 15:42

Improve Your Boiler’s Combustion Efficiency

OFFICE OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY • U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Combustion Efficiency

Operating your boiler with an optimum amount of excess air will minimize heat loss up the stack and improve combustion efficiency. Combustion efficiency is a measure of how effectively the heat content of a fuel is transferred into usable heat. The stack temperature and flue gas oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentrations are primary indicators of combustion efficiency.

Given complete mixing, a precise or stoichiometric amount of air is required to completely react with a given quantity of fuel. In practice, combustion conditions are never ideal, and additional or “excess” air must be supplied to completely burn the fuel.

The correct amount of excess air is determined from analyzing flue gas oxygen or carbon dioxide concentrations. Inadequate excess air results in unburned combustibles (fuel, soot, smoke, and carbon monoxide) while too much results in heat lost due to the increased flue gas flow—thus lowering the overall boiler fuel-to-steam efficiency. The table relates stack readings to boiler performance.

Assumes complete combustion with no water vapor in the combustion air.

On well-designed natural gas-fired systems, an excess air level of 10% is attainable. An often stated rule of thumb is that boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for each 15% reduction in excess air or 40°F reduction in stack gas temperature. 

Example

A boiler operates for 8,000 hours per year and consumes 500,000 MMBtu of natural gas while producing 45,000 lb/hr of 150 psig steam. Stack gas measurements indicate an excess air level of 44.9% with a flue gas less combustion air temperature of 400°F. From the table, the boiler combustion efficiency is 78.2% (E1). Tuning the boiler reduces the excess air to 9.5% with a flue gas less combustion air temperature of 300°F. The boiler combustion efficiency increases to 83.1% (E2). Assuming a steam value of $4.50/MMBtu, the annual cost savings are:

Cost Savings = Fuel Consumption x (1 - E1/E2) x steam cost = 29,482 MMBtu/yr x $4.50/MMBtu = $132,671 annually

Suggested Actions

Boilers often operate at excess air levels higher than the optimum. Periodically monitor flue gas composition and tune your boilers to maintain excess air at optimum levels.

Flue Gas Analyzers

The percentage of oxygen in the flue gas can be measured by inexpensive gas-absorbing test kits. More expensive ($500- $1,000) hand-held, computer- based analyzers display percent oxygen, stack gas temperature, and boiler efficiency. They are a recommended investment for any boiler system with annual fuel costs exceeding $50,000.

Oxygen Trim Systems

When fuel composition is highly variable (such as refinery gas, hog fuel, or multi-fuel boilers), or where steam flows are highly variable, an on-line oxygen analyzer should be considered. The oxygen “trim” system provides feedback to the burner controls to automatically minimize excess combustion air and optimize the air-to-fuel ratio.

About DOE’s Office of Industrial Technologies

The Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), through partnerships with industry, government, and non-governmental organizations, develops and delivers advanced energy efficiency, renewable energy, and pollution prevention technologies for industrial applications. OIT is part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

OIT encourages industry-wide efforts to boost resource productivity through a strategy called Industries of the Future (IOF). IOF focuses on the following nine energy- and resource-intensive industries:

• Agriculture • Aluminum • Chemicals

• Forest Products • Glass • Metal Casting

• Mining • Petroleum • Steel

OIT and its BestPractices program offer a wide variety of resources to industrial partners that cover motor, steam, compressed air, and process heating systems. For example, BestPractices software can help you decide whether to replace or rewind motors (MotorMaster+), assess the efficiency of pumping systems (PSAT), compressed air systems (AirMaster+), steam systems (Steam Scoping Tool), or determine optimal insulation thickness for pipes and pressure vessels (3E Plus). Training is available to help you or your staff learn how to use these software programs and learn more about industrial systems. Workshops are held around the country on topics such as “Capturing the Value of Steam Efficiency,” “Fundamentals and Advanced Management of Compressed Air Systems,” and “Motor System Management.” Available technical publications range from case studies and tip sheets to sourcebooks and market assessments. The Energy Matters newsletter, for example, provides timely articles and information on comprehensive energy systems for industry. You can access these resources and more by visiting the BestPractices Web site at www.oit.doe.gov/bestpractices or by contacting the OIT Clearinghouse at 800-862-2086 or via email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

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